Bannière

The Third Miracle

Louis Tracy

When the front door closed behind him, Blake stood on the broad upper step, and produced a pipe and pouch. His mood was curiously subdued, but he felt he needed something to bite on. And, suddenly, all the varied tints of colour in street and sky became singularly bright and vivid. Knowing little or nothing of physiology, he suspected, nevertheless, that that restless, unstable heart of his was responding to a mental surge, which in its own queer way affected his sight, and the mere notion of such yielding was irritating. “What’s the use of getting the wind up?” he admonished himself. “Here goes for a hike round Regent’s Park! I’ll just  gure things out. Six months! Perhaps! Well, I’d better allow for the six. What’s to be done when you’re told in June you’ve got to push off by Christmas?

Journalist then profligate novelist, Louis Tracy (1863-1928) has written stories of future wars, adventures novels and, above all, crime fiction, the mystery and thriller genres becoming finally the prominent features of his litterary career. Louis Tracy probably is one of the ‘best kept secrets’ of the British detective litterature, and the time has come to rediscover the investigations of Scotland Yard brightests, Winter and Furneaux, in a novel of 1927.

Foreword by Jean-Daniel Brèque